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How to Find a Reliable Contractor for Your Projects!

This expert advice will help you find a contractor to get your renovation done right.

For most homeowners, the hardest part of any home renovation project isn’t the work itself – it’s finding a competent and reliable contractor to do the job. Installing kitchen cabinets, knocking down walls or retiling floors are straightforward tasks compared with the struggle of hiring a quality contractor who will perform at a high level from start to finish.

Everyone knows stories of horrendous contractors who tore apart the kitchen and never returned or projects that ended up costing three times the contractor’s original estimate.

Even with a good contractor, home renovation can be stressful, expensive and involve unpleasant surprises, such as rotted subfloors that are revealed when tile is removed or dangerous electrical wiring or leaking pipes behind walls.

Here are some tips to find the right contractor while still keeping your budget – and sanity – under control.

Know What You Want Before You Get Estimates
First things first: “Start with a plan and some ideas,” Hicks says. “Don’t start by talking to contractors.” You’ll get a more accurate estimate if you can be specific about what you want done and the materials you would like to use to make it happen.

Ask Friends, Relatives and Co-Workers for References
People in your neighborhood who have done similar projects are great resources. If you know anyone in the building trades, ask them as well. Employees of local hardware stores may also be able to provide contractor referrals.

Interview at Least 5 Contractors
Ask a lot of questions and get a written proposal with an estimate from each. When you compare bids, make sure each one includes the same materials and the same tasks, so you’re comparing apples and apples. Dan DiClerico, smart home strategist and home expert for HomeAdvisor, recommends reaching out to as many as 10 contractors, but a detailed conversation and estimate from at least five will help you feel more confident as you compare options and make decisions about the project. “It really is such a valuable part of the process from an education and experience perspective,” DiClerico says.

Be Realistic About Availability
A contractor’s availability can depend on the time of year and where you live, but the best contractors have consistent work, so expect to wait a few months for your project to start. “Three months is going to give them time to hopefully finish up their current project and get yours on the calendar,” DiClerico says. “But if you can plan it six months out, that’s even better.”

Ask What Work Will Be Done by Subcontractors
A large renovation may require the contractor to bring in subcontractors for specialized work such as electrical, plumbing or detailed carpentry. You’ll want to know when outside workers will be in the home, and you also want to know that your contractor will manage and supervise their work. “(Homeowners) really should have as little interaction with the (subcontractors) as possible,” DiClerico says.

Choose the Right Contractor for the Right Project
Someone who did a good job tiling your neighbor’s bathroom isn’t necessarily the right person to build an addition to your home. Aim to find a company that routinely does the kind of project you want done. “You don’t want them to use you as a guinea pig,” Hicks says.

Check Licenses, Complaints and Litigation History
General contractors and most subcontractors should be licensed, though the procedure varies by state and municipality. Check your state disciplinary boards, Better Business Bureau and local court records for problems. Ask the contractor for a copy of his or her license and copies of the licenses of the subcontractors who will be involved in the project.

Check References
Talk to both clients and subcontractors, who can tell you if the contractor pays them on time. Ask previous clients if the contractor’s estimate was close to the final cost, if they got along with the project manager and if it’s possible to see closeup photos of any completed work.